dildoreo:

dildoreo:

one time i took a picture of a tiger at the zoo and the tiger smiled for the picture it was very great and the best picture i’ve ever taken

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yayfeminism:

One would assume that scientists, who are trained to think objectively, are completely immune to gender discrimination. However, a recent Yale study by Corinne Moss-Racusin and colleagues suggests otherwise.

The researchers created a fictional student and sent out the student’s application to science professors at top, research-intensive universities in the United States. The professors were asked to evaluate how competent this student was, how likely they would be to hire the student, how much they would pay this student, and how willing they would be to mentor the student. All of the applications sent out were identical, except for the fact that half were for a male applicant, John, and half were for a female applicant, Jennifer. Results showed that, with statistical significance, both male and female faculty at these institutions were biased towards male students over female students.
Data from the study shows that on average, science faculty was willing to pay the male applicant about $4,000 more per year. source

yayfeminism:

One would assume that scientists, who are trained to think objectively, are completely immune to gender discrimination. However, a recent Yale study by Corinne Moss-Racusin and colleagues suggests otherwise.

The researchers created a fictional student and sent out the student’s application to science professors at top, research-intensive universities in the United States. The professors were asked to evaluate how competent this student was, how likely they would be to hire the student, how much they would pay this student, and how willing they would be to mentor the student. All of the applications sent out were identical, except for the fact that half were for a male applicant, John, and half were for a female applicant, Jennifer. Results showed that, with statistical significance, both male and female faculty at these institutions were biased towards male students over female students.

Data from the study shows that on average, science faculty was willing to pay the male applicant about $4,000 more per year. 
source

babyimjaded:

radcoolswag:

stasiascrolls:

ok tumblr, i hear you loud and clear. Leonardo DOES deserve an Oscar. 

but are we just going to ignore the fact that Johnny Depp has no Oscar either?

He

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has

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never

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won

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an

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oscar

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WHAT THE FUCK IS WRONG WITH THE ACADEMY

THANK YOU I HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS.

problackgirl:

we’ve taught girls to romanticise nearly everything a boy does. when i was younger i thought it was cute that boys chased the girl even after she said no. i loved it when after a girl moved away from a kiss, the guy would pull her back and force it on. i thought a guy saying ‘i won’t take a no for an answer’ was passionate and romantic. we’re literally always teaching girls to romanticise abusive traits.

needlekind:

bloodsplotched:

lupinely:

i can’t believe jkr doesn’t know remus lupin is queer do you think someone should tell her

once in an interview someone asked her if charlie weasley was gay and she gave them this look and said DUMBLEDORE’s gay like there’s only room for a single queer in the wizarding world

 (via vacantvisionary)

mayyourbeardgroweverlonger and I have the best plans and boldnessbemyfriend is just wrong

mayyourbeardgroweverlonger and I have the best plans and boldnessbemyfriend is just wrong

I’ve cried in front of him more times than I can actually count; some nights he kisses my face and I collapse like a dying star in his bed, other nights I am spilling sunlight from my mouth, wiping tears from the corners of my eyes while I laugh endlessly.

I am at the deli counter when he texts me to tell me that if I was a fruit, I’d be a fineapple; I am in the passenger seat of his car when plays with my bare ring finger, making promises that don’t need to be spoken out loud; I am cradled against his shoulder while I explain the electricity he sends to my veins. I am standing in front of the mirror, tracing the marks his mouth leaves behind; I am a map of all the places he has loved me.

One night, I took a pregnancy test in Walgreen’s bathroom while the rest of our city blurred by under rainy skies. The tiny pink line let us breathe sighs of relief, and maybe a little bit of sadness, into each other’s shoulders. He holds my shaking hands, and I know what it’s like to not be so afraid.

The day my body turned on me, I think his hair began to gray. I sit in the waiting room at the hospital and wonder about the growths inside of me; about the pain in the pit of my stomach; I wonder about what I would’ve done without him that day. We’ve been sitting in the same chairs for three hours now, and he’s fallen asleep. He wakes up when the nurse comes to check my blood pressure and rate my pain again; I tell her I’m at a seven out of ten, and he rubs the back of my hand with his thumb and taps his foot. When the nurse leaves, I say, “I’m sorry you chose the sick one” and with no hesitation, he says “I’m not” and I swallow my tears and my pain.

And I guess if I had to pick a way to describe how I’ve been feeling lately, it would be thankful. And maybe all of this a thank you note, maybe each line I etch into my own history book is a thank you to note to him. It’s thanking him for being patient with my nightmares and long showers; with my tears and the gaps in my sentences. Thank you notes for the arch in my back and the goosebumps on my forearms, for the bruises across my collarbone, for his voice in my ear. Thank you notes for the stars on his ceiling and his thumb across my cheek; thank you notes for the sun in my lungs; for the love that has given me more than words can describe; thank you notes for all the stars in his eyes and the place in his heart that was built for me.
laughhard:

Every Sports Interview

laughhard:

Every Sports Interview

osjecam:

sorry i’m late, professor. i’m disenchanted with the human experience and waking up every morning thrusts me into an instant existential crisis

shodobear:

stunningpicture:

A grape, wearing a raspberry.

I am froot.

shodobear:

stunningpicture:

A grape, wearing a raspberry.

I am froot.

Secret Service praised for their tremendous restraint with the White House fence jumper?

smallrevolutionary:

odinsblog:

I sure wish they showed some of that restraint to Miriam Carey before they shot her dead…with her child in the car

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i forgot all about this. christ.

mumblingsage:

this-disgusting-ribbon:

LOOKS LIKE MEAT’S BACK ON THE MENU, BOYS" bellows the Orc to his Orc friends. Orcs know what menus are. Orcs know what restaurants are. are there bistros in Mordor? these are the questions i need answering

The moss-troll problem, or, Accidental Worldbuilding Through Metaphors

kateordie:

Gotham Academy is out today, so I figured I’d dress the part. There’s a bat-pin on my tie.

kateordie:

Gotham Academy is out today, so I figured I’d dress the part. There’s a bat-pin on my tie.

sonofbaldwin:

Apparently, Americans like white Jesus, but not brown Allah.

sonofbaldwin:

Apparently, Americans like white Jesus, but not brown Allah.

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”
"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”

"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.